Launched in 1869, the Cutty Sark was one of the fastest tea clippers of her day and is now the world’s last remaining tea clipper. The Cutty Sark suffered from a major fire on 21 May 2007 and closed for renovations before re-opening to visitors several years later.

Launched in 1869, the Cutty Sark was one of the fastest tea clippers of her day and is now the world’s last remaining tea clipper. The Cutty Sark suffered from a major fire on 21 May 2007 and closed for renovations before re-opening to visitors several years later.

The ship was originally built for the tea trade (importing tea from China) but was soon engaged in shipping wool from Australia. In 1895 she was sold to a Portuguese company and renamed the Ferreira and continued as a cargo ship before returning to British ownership as a training ship based in Falmouth, Cornwall.

Cutty Sark is the nickname given to the witch Nannie Dee, which serves as the ship’s figurehead, which in turn originates from the 1791 Burn’s poem Tam o’ Shanter. A brand of Scotch whisky is named after the ship.

What to see on the Cutty Sark

The Cutty Sark is on display in Greenwich. The ship is raised three metres above ground, giving visitors a unique perspective as you are able to walk underneath the ship. Visitors are also able to see the sailor’s quarters and an exhibition about the ship’s history and even have afternoon tea on board.

Visiting Cutty Sark

Cutty Sark sits on a dry dock close to the centre of Greenwich. It is around a ten-minute walk from Greenwich station, although Cutty Sark DLR station is even closer (around a three-minute walk). It is also accessible via the Greenwich Foot Tunnel from Island Gardens DLR station on the Isle of Dogs (an eight-minute walk).

Admission includes a guided talk by characters from the ship’s colourful past including Captain Woodget, the Cutty Sark’s longest-serving master and Jock Willis, who built the ship. The talks take place on the main deck at 11am, noon, 1.30pm and 2.30pm daily.

This is a great family attraction with something for everyone. Children love exploring the ship, but unlike other child-friendly attractions, it is also an interesting place for adults to visit.

Although you can easily spend a couple of hours exploring the ship, you can quickly see it in an hour if pressed for time.

Free entry to the Cutty Sark with the London Pass

The London Pass gives you free entry to the Cutty Sark and over 80 other attractions in and around London.

We may earn a small commission if you purchase a London Pass after clicking this link.

Amenities
  • Wheelchair access
  • Free guided tours
  • Cafe/restaurant

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