Hogarth’s House

Free

Hogarth’s House is a museum in the former home of the celebrated 18th-century artist, William Hogarth.

The Grade I listed building was built between 1713 and 1717 as a country house occupying the corner of an orchard on the edge of Chiswick, which, at the time, was a large village distinct from the rest of London.

The Hogarths purchased the house in 1749 and it was used as William Hogarth’s country retreat from 1749 until 1764. The house was sold in 1900 and it was scheduled to be demolished to make way for new development but a campaign led by a consortium of artists and writers saved the house and it was opened to the public in 1904, making it one of England’s oldest historic house museums.

This Grade I listed building was William Hogarth’s country house from 1749 until 1764. The mulberry tree in the foreground dates from Hogarth’s time and many believe that it is from the original orchard, which was planted in the 1670s.
This Grade I listed building was William Hogarth’s country house from 1749 until 1764. The mulberry tree in the foreground dates from Hogarth’s time and many believe that it is from the original orchard, which was planted in the 1670s.

What to see at Hogarth’s House

Hogarth’s House is furnished with replica furniture depicting how it would have appeared when William Hogarth lived here. The house also features prints of many of Hogarth’s best-known works including the series A Harlot’s Progress, A Rake’s Progress and Marriage À-la-Mode.

The house has a walled garden containing a mulberry tree, which is believed to have been a survivor of the original orchard that was planted in the 1670s.

Visiting Hogarth’s House

Hogarth’s House is on the busy A4, just a short walk from the Hogarth Roundabout in Chiswick in West London. It is only a one-minute walk from the Premier Inn London Chiswick hotel and Chiswick House and Gardens, Fuller’s Griffin Brewery and the Sipsmith gin distillery are only a 10-minute walk from here.

Although there is a lot more in the immediate area than you would expect for a former country house in suburban West London, it is not quite as easy to get to by public transport as many other tourist attractions as it is a 15–20-minute walk from the nearest tube station (Turnham Green on the District line). If you would rather not walk that far, it is only a two-minute walk from a bus stop on Burlington Lane where you can catch bus route 190 to Hammersmith station.

Admission to Hogarth’s House is free of charge and it is open Tuesday to Sunday.

Although the ground floor of the house and the mulberry garden are wheelchair accessible, access to the first floor is via a narrow staircase.

If you enjoyed this museum and would like to see more of Hogarth’s works, you can visit Sir John Soane’s Museum, where you can see the original paintings of A Rake’s Progress, and the National Gallery, where you can see the originals of Marriage À-la-Mode.

There are no comments yet.

Submit your review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Plan your next trip to England with us

Planning a trip to England? englandrover.com is your independent source of travel information with information about how to get around, what to see and do and where to stay on your next trip to England.

Plan your next trip to England with us

Planning a trip to England? englandrover.com is your independent source of travel information with information about how to get around, what to see and do and where to stay on your next trip to England.

The South

The Midlands

The North

Back to England Rover home

Copyright 2018–2023 by BUG Travel Publishing Ltd.

Back to England Rover home

Copyright 2018–2023 BUG Travel Publishing Ltd

Login

Register

Your personal data will be used to support your experience throughout this website, to manage access to your account, and for other purposes described in our privacy policy.

Already have account?

Lost Password

Please enter your username or email address. You will receive a link to create a new password via email.