Glastonbury Tor is a hill within walking distance from Glastonbury’s town centre. It is steeped in legend with links to Celtic mythology and the myths surrounding King Arthur and the Holy Grail.

The Saxon and early medieval periods saw the construction of buildings on the summit of the tor, which are believed to have been used for religious purposes. The original wooden church was destroyed by an earthquake in 1275 and in the 14th century it was replaced with the stone Church of St Michael and the ruins of this church remain today.

The hill is noted for its lynchets (terraces); however, their origins are unknown and experts have not been able to confirm whether these are artificial or natural formations. Some theories suggest that these lynchets are Iron Age fortifications while others suggest that they were created for agricultural purposes or as a spiral walkway for pilgrims to reach the summit.

Glastonbury Tor is a conical-shaped hill just a short walk from the centre of Glastonbury
Glastonbury Tor is a conical-shaped hill just a short walk from the centre of Glastonbury

What to see at Glastonbury Tor

The 158m- (518 ft)-high hill offers panoramic views of Glastonbury, Street and the surrounding Somerset countryside. From the summit, you can see Cadbury Castle, Cheddar Gorge, Taunton, and on a clear day, you can see as far as the coast.

Apart from the view, the main attraction of Glastonbury Tor is the ruin of the bell tower of the 14th-century St Michael’s Church.

The path to the summit of Glastonbury Tor
The path to the summit of Glastonbury Tor

Visiting Glastonbury Tor

Glastonbury Tor is just a short walk from Glastonbury town centre and there are several paths to the summit.

Most people follow the path that leaves from Wellhouse Lane near the Chalice Well, which has the gentlest incline. The path from Stone Down Lane is a shorter walk but it is much steeper and many visitors return back to Glastonbury along this route. It takes 15–20 minutes to walk up to the summit and a little less to come back down again.

The main route leaves from the bottom of Wellhouse Lane (the footpath joins Wellhouse Lane before you get to the White Spring).

Glastonbury Tor is free to visit and is accessible 24 hours a day.

You should allow 1​​½–2 hours to visit Glastonbury Tor.

There are no comments yet.

Submit your review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Plan your next trip to England with us

Planning a trip to England? englandrover.com is your independent source of travel information with information about how to get around, what to see and do and where to stay on your next trip to England.

Plan your next trip to England with us

Planning a trip to England? englandrover.com is your independent source of travel information with information about how to get around, what to see and do and where to stay on your next trip to England.

The South

The Midlands

The North

Back to England Rover home

Copyright 2018–2021 by BUG Travel Publishing Ltd.

Back to England Rover home

Copyright 2018–2021 BUG Travel Publishing Ltd

Login

Register

Your personal data will be used to support your experience throughout this website, to manage access to your account, and for other purposes described in our privacy policy.

Already have account?

Lost Password

Please enter your username or email address. You will receive a link to create a new password via email.